My generation teachers reflection

Don - August 18, Peter, This is of great help. I face freshman on thursday. I was working up a talk using prezi and found yours, then I found this. Peter Pappas - August 18, Don, Thanks for taking the time to post.

My generation teachers reflection

How to Ease Back to School Butterflies A few tips for parents on how to battle the back to school butterflies. The Process of Reflection Connecting self-reflection to effective teaching is a process.

The first step is to figure out what you want to reflect upon—are you looking at a particular feature of your teaching or is this reflection in response to a specific problem in your classroom? Whatever the case may be, you should start by collecting information. Here are a few ways that you can do this: A journal is an easy way to reflect upon what just happened during your instruction.

After each lesson, simply jot down a few notes describing your reactions and feelings and then follow up with any observations you have about your students.

My generation teachers reflection

If it helps, you can break up your journal into concrete sections, such lesson objective, materials, classroom management, students, teacher, etc. In this way, you can be consistent with how you measure your assessments time after time. You can find specific questions to ask yourself below. A video recording of your teaching is valuable because it provides an unaltered and unbiased vantage point for how effective your lesson may be from both a teacher and student perspective.

My generation teachers reflection

Many colleges actually use this method to teach up and coming teachers the value of self-reflection. Students are very observant and love to give feedback. Invite a colleague to come into your classroom and observe your teaching. To help him frame your lesson critique more clearly, create a questionnaire you can use some of the questions below for your colleague to fill out as they observe.

Afterward, make some time to sit down with him so he can more accurately convey what he saw. Here are a few suggestions to get you started: Lesson Objectives Was the lesson too easy or too difficult for the students?

Did the students understand what was being taught? Did the materials keep the students engaged in the lesson?

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What materials did we use that worked in the lesson? Students With what parts of the lesson did the students seem most engaged? With what parts of the lesson did students seem least engaged with?

Classroom Management Was the lesson taught at a reasonable pace? Did all students participate in the lesson? Teacher How effective was the overall lesson?

How can I do it better next time? Did I meet all of my objectives? How did I deal with any problems that came up during instruction? How was my overall attitude and delivery throughout class?

The first thing you should look for is any recurring patterns. If you video recorded your lesson, did you find anything that kept happening over and over?Reflection may be both formal (such as required by regular conferences in which teachers discuss their instructional practices) or informal (such as driving home from school and thinking about the day’s lessons and student learning); in both instances, there is a growing body of evidence that teacher reflection results in improved teacher.

My Reflection Paper - Practice Teaching - Download as Word Doc .doc /.docx), PDF File .pdf), Text File .txt) or read online. My personal reflection paper for my practice teaching.

My personal reflection paper for my practice teaching. My Coordinating Teacher always tried her best to point out and make me understand my mistakes in5/5(5).

I think this end of year reflection for teachers is key. On this post, I will share the simple questions I ask myself each year to reflect and grow as an educator.

I like to ask these questions and reflect right at the end of the year while it is still fresh on my mind. Ask yourself: “What are my own perceptions of my teaching?” It is key to engage systematic reflection on your own teaching.

Some easy yet consistent strategies for keeping track of your teaching are to annotate assignments, tests . Reflection may be both formal (such as required by regular conferences in which teachers discuss their instructional practices) or informal (such as driving home from school and thinking about the day’s lessons and student learning); in both instances, there is a growing body of evidence that teacher reflection results in improved teacher.

VEA - Reflecting on Teaching

Reflection is deliberate and structured thinking about choices. It is an integral step to improving our practice. Through reflection, we as educators can look clearly at our successes and struggles and consider options for change.

The Reflective Teacher: A Taxonomy of Reflection (Part 3) – Copy / Paste by Peter Pappas